Viability of Bifidobacterium bifidum 1 under hypothermia, single and repeated freeze-thaw cycles.

Authors

  • Oksana V. Knysh Mechnikov Institute of Microbiology and Immunology of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkiv
  • Oleksandr V. Pakhomov Institute for Problems of Cryobiology and Cryomedicine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkiv; V.N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Kharkiv
  • Antonina М. Kompaniets Institute for Problems of Cryobiology and Cryomedicine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkiv
  • Valentina P. Polianska Ukrainian Medical Stomatological Academy, Poltava
  • Svitlana V. Zachepylo Ukrainian Medical Stomatological Academy, Poltava

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.15407/cryo30.03.247

Keywords:

bifidobacteria, viability, freeze-thaw, thermal cycling, daily biomass growth, biofilm formation

Abstract

Abstract: The viability of bacteria of the Bifidobacterium bifidum 1 probiotic strain under hypothermia, single and repeated freeze-thaw cycles (thermal cycling) was studied. Samples of bifidobacterial suspensions were frozen immediately after isolation or after daily hypothermic storage in three ways to the final temperature of either (–23 ± 1) or (–196 ± 1)ºС. After slow freezing of the samples down to (–23 ± 1) ºС, bigger quantitative losses of bifidobacteria were observed if compared with those after rapid freezing by a direct immersion into liquid nitrogen. Storage of the samples under hypothermia and a single freeze-thaw was accompanied with a strong inhibition of the daily growth of bifidobacteria biomass and an increased formation of biofilms. Ten-fold thermal cycling in the most unfavorable way for survival did not lead to the death of all cells in suspensions. Up to 35% of bifidobacteria remained viable. Indices of the bifidobacteria ability to enhance biomass remained at the level of 35%, and the ability to form biofilm was kept at the level of 43.7–65.5% of the corresponding indices for freshly isolated cells.

 

Probl Cryobiol Cryomed 2020; 30(3): 247–255

Author Biography

Antonina М. Kompaniets, Institute for Problems of Cryobiology and Cryomedicine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkiv

Laboratory of Cryoprotectants

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Published

2020-09-23

How to Cite

Knysh, O., Pakhomov, O., Kompaniets, A., Polianska, V., & Zachepylo , S. (2020). Viability of Bifidobacterium bifidum 1 under hypothermia, single and repeated freeze-thaw cycles . Problems of Cryobiology and Cryomedicine, 30(3), 247-255. https://doi.org/10.15407/cryo30.03.247

Issue

Section

Theoretical and Experimental Cryobiology